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  • 1958: Dr Luigi Mara spent the last four years in a relentless mosquito hunt all across malaria-ridden Kurdistan in Iraq. He managed to win the confidence of the Kurds, and was known among them as "Dr Malaria".

  • Kim In Soon, a six-year-old from the village of Wedong Nyun, in Southern Korea, was doing her first year in school; when a WHO assisted mobile leprosy team found her symptoms of leprosy.

  • Roadside eye care: helping Indian truckers stay safe behind the wheel

  • This photo story aims to illustrate both WHO staff working in the field and rehabilitation practices for people who struggles with mobility limitations

  • Dr. Sana Hafeez, a young Pakistani, suffers from a loss of mobility after a severe spinal cord injury. This photo story aims to offer a glimpse of her daily life and rehabilitation challenges.

  • Follow Hilda and Narciso, a senior couple during their visual examination at the Taytawasi Senior center in Lima

  • Hidden cities is a joint WHO / UN-HABITAT report about urbanization and global health issues. Photo stories from around the world reflect the hidden realities urban dwellers are facing, and highlight some health inequities. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/hidden-cities-unmasking-and-overcoming-health-inequities-in-urban-settings

  • Hidden cities is a joint WHO / UN-HABITAT report about urbanization and global health issues. Photo stories from around the world reflect the hidden realities urban dwellers are facing, and highlight some health inequities. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/hidden-cities-unmasking-and-overcoming-health-inequities-in-urban-settings

  • Hidden cities is a joint WHO / UN-HABITAT report about urbanization and global health issues. Photo stories from around the world reflect the hidden realities urban dwellers are facing, and highlight some health inequities. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/hidden-cities-unmasking-and-overcoming-health-inequities-in-urban-settings

  • Hidden cities is a joint WHO / UN-HABITAT report about urbanization and global health issues. Photo stories from around the world reflect the hidden realities urban dwellers are facing, and highlight some health inequities. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/hidden-cities-unmasking-and-overcoming-health-inequities-in-urban-settings

  • Hidden cities is a joint WHO / UN-HABITAT report about urbanization and global health issues. Photo stories from around the world reflect the hidden realities urban dwellers are facing, and highlight some health inequities. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/hidden-cities-unmasking-and-overcoming-health-inequities-in-urban-settings

  • The disease profile of the world is rapidly evolving. This is especially true in low and middle income countries where chronic diseases are creating a double burden on top of infectious diseases. As these stories will show, even least developed countries are not immune to the growing epidemics of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other chronic diseases. https://www.who.int/ncdnet/photo_stories/en/

  • The disease profile of the world is rapidly evolving. This is especially true in low and middle income countries where chronic diseases are creating a double burden on top of infectious diseases. As these stories will show, even least developed countries are not immune to the growing epidemics of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other chronic diseases. https://www.who.int/ncdnet/photo_stories/en/

  • The disease profile of the world is rapidly evolving. This is especially true in low and middle income countries where chronic diseases are creating a double burden on top of infectious diseases. As these stories will show, even least developed countries are not immune to the growing epidemics of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other chronic diseases. https://www.who.int/ncdnet/photo_stories/en/

  • One year after giving birth, our mothers – Damiana from Bolivia, Samah from Egypt, Hiwot from Ethiopia, Renu from India, Bounlid from Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Claire from the United Kingdom – celebrate their baby's first year. At one year, our babies are becoming little people. They are taking their first steps and speaking their first words. They are also, thankfully, healthy. Every child, with the exception of Lang in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is fully immunized against childhood diseases. All six children are now eating solid foods and four are still breastfeeding. WHO recommends that all children receive immunizations against polio, tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, hepatitis…

  • One year after giving birth, our mothers – Damiana from Bolivia, Samah from Egypt, Hiwot from Ethiopia, Renu from India, Bounlid from Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Claire from the United Kingdom – celebrate their baby's first year. At one year, our babies are becoming little people. They are taking their first steps and speaking their first words. They are also, thankfully, healthy. Every child, with the exception of Lang in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is fully immunized against childhood diseases. All six children are now eating solid foods and four are still breastfeeding. WHO recommends that all children receive immunizations against polio, tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, hepatitis…

  • One year after giving birth, our mothers – Damiana from Bolivia, Samah from Egypt, Hiwot from Ethiopia, Renu from India, Bounlid from Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Claire from the United Kingdom – celebrate their baby's first year. At one year, our babies are becoming little people. They are taking their first steps and speaking their first words. They are also, thankfully, healthy. Every child, with the exception of Lang in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is fully immunized against childhood diseases. All six children are now eating solid foods and four are still breastfeeding. WHO recommends that all children receive immunizations against polio, tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, hepatitis…

  • One year after giving birth, our mothers – Damiana from Bolivia, Samah from Egypt, Hiwot from Ethiopia, Renu from India, Bounlid from Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Claire from the United Kingdom – celebrate their baby's first year. At one year, our babies are becoming little people. They are taking their first steps and speaking their first words. They are also, thankfully, healthy. Every child, with the exception of Lang in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is fully immunized against childhood diseases. All six children are now eating solid foods and four are still breastfeeding. WHO recommends that all children receive immunizations against polio, tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, hepatitis…

  • One year after giving birth, our mothers – Damiana from Bolivia, Samah from Egypt, Hiwot from Ethiopia, Renu from India, Bounlid from Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Claire from the United Kingdom – celebrate their baby's first year. At one year, our babies are becoming little people. They are taking their first steps and speaking their first words. They are also, thankfully, healthy. Every child, with the exception of Lang in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is fully immunized against childhood diseases. All six children are now eating solid foods and four are still breastfeeding. WHO recommends that all children receive immunizations against polio, tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, hepatitis…

  • The Seishi Ryogo En, founded in 1937, is Japan's first "hospital, school and home" community centre for the rehabilitation of crippled children.

  • Dr Edmond, country doctor in a small town in the Department of the Creuse, a rugged, highland area in the centre of France, came from a long line of country doctors: The Edmonds have been country doctors through father and son since the reign of Louis XIV. Dr Edmond's realm covered a radius of 20 kilometres around his home. In 40 years of practice (during which time he wore out ten cars, travelling a million kilometres on his rounds and attending some 150,000 patients), Dr Edmond saw public health problems shift from tuberculosis, venereal diseases, death in child birth and infant mortality to cancer.